Epidemiology of Coccidioidomycosis

  • Demosthenes Pappagianis
Part of the Current Topics in Infectious Disease book series (CTID)

Abstract

Coccidioidomycosis is primarily a disease of the New World in which certain soil foci harbor Coccidioides immitis (Fig. 1). However, the disease, acquired by inhalation of airborne arthroconidia from the soil, may lead to infections in persons outside the endemic foci either because the individuals have traveled or lived in the endemic areas, or more rarely, because the arthroconidia are transported on some product (fomites), e.g., cotton contaminated in the endemic areas or on the wind. The endemic areas have remained relatively well delimited. While it is true that new endemic foci have been demonstrated over the past several years, e.g., in Northern California, these have been within or near the established outlines of endemicity. The endemic area extends from approximately 40° N 120° W in California to the north to 40° S 65° W in Argentina to the south.

Keywords

Endemic Area Dust Storm Diagnostic Status Endemic Focus Kern County 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Demosthenes Pappagianis

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