Current Research with Organ Cultures of Human Tumors

  • Et. Wolff
  • Em. Wolff

Abstract

It is of considerable interest, from the standpoint of fundamental and applied research, to culture malignant human tumors in vitro in the form of massive, organized nodules such as those which exist in the organism. We shall see later that this objective can be attained by a relatively simple technique which produces genuine miniature tumors, some of which can multiply indefinitely. It is easy to imagine the interest that such techniques arouse from the point of view of experimentation on human cancer, for it is very seldom that one can perform direct experiments on such material. Occasionally human tumors can be transplanted into an animal. However, such instances are rare and one is normally obliged to extrapolate from experiments with animal tumors. This is why we have sought to develop media and conditions which permit the organotypic culture of human tumors.

Keywords

Organ Culture Chick Embryo Organotypic Culture Embryo Extract Tumor Explants 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Et. Wolff
    • 1
  • Em. Wolff
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire d’Embryologie ExpérimentaleCollège de FranceParisFrance

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