Addressing the Urban Management Challenge: Indonesia’s Integrated Urban Infrastructure Development Program

  • G. Thomas Kingsley

Abstract

We are all familiar with the sizeable gap that exists between developing countries’ urban infrastructure requirements and the funds those countries have available to pay for them — a gap that has certainly widened in the troubled economic environment of the 1980s. Financing, however, is not always the binding constraint. Around the world today there are many funded projects that are not moving ahead simply because there is no one available to manage them. More broadly, the lack of trained managers is constraining the expansion of all basic urban government functions in the face of the unparalleled growth of the cities and towns in the developing world. This problem is one of the major barriers to the “replicability” of innovations in urban development (Cohen, 1983) This paper assesses the scope and future of the urban management challenge and describes a promising approach now being implemented in Indonesia: the Integrated Urban Infrastructure Development Program (IUIDP).

Keywords

Human Settlement External Donor Capital Budget Urban Service Local Revenue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cochrane, Glynn, 1983, “Policies for Strengthening Local Government in Developing Countries,” World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 582, The World Bank, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  2. Cohen, Michael A., 1983, “The Challenge of Replicability: Toward a New Paradigm for Urban Shelter in Developing Countries,” in Regional Development Dialogue, Spring.Google Scholar
  3. Hamer, Andres, 1985, “Urbanization Patterns in the Third World: How to Create a Basis for Efficient Growth,” Finance and Development, March.Google Scholar
  4. Hendropranoto Suselo, 1984, “Experiences in Providing Urban Services in Secondary Cities in Indonesia,” Paper presented to the 1984 African Conference on the Problems of Urbanization in Africa, Dakar, April.Google Scholar
  5. Kingsley, G., Thomas, 1984, “Urban Strategies and Integrated Urban Development,” paper presented at a Workshop of the Directorate General Cipta Karya, Puncak, July. Reprinted in UNCHS Habitat News, Vo. 6, No. 3, December, Nairobi, UNCHS.Google Scholar
  6. Kingsley, G. Thomas, Gardiner, Peter and Stolte, Willem B., 1985, Urban growth and structure in Indonesia, National Urban Development Strategy Project Report TI.6/C3, Directorate General of Human Settlements, Department of Public Works, Government of Indonesia, and United Nations Centre for Human Settlements, Jakarta, August.Google Scholar
  7. Kubr, Milan and Wallace, John, 1983, “Successes and Failures in Meeting the Management Challenge: Strategies and their Implementation, ”World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 585, The World Bank, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  8. Linn, Johannes, F., 1983, “Cities in the Developing World: Policies for Their Equitable and Efficient Growth,” A World Bank Research Publication, Oxford University Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  9. National Urban Development Strategy Project, 1985, National Urban Development Strategy Project Final Report, Report T2.3/3, Directorate General of Human Settlements, Department of Public Works, Government of Indonesia, and United Nations Centre for Human Settlements, Jakarta, September.Google Scholar
  10. National Urban Development Strategy Project/PADCO, 1985, Urban Services Investments for Alternative Strategies, Report T1.8/SC4, Directorate General of Human Settlements, Department of Public Works, Government of Indonesia, and United Nations Centre for Human Settlements, September.Google Scholar
  11. Ozgediz, Selcuk, 1983, Managing the Public Service in Developing Countries: Issues and Prospects, World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 583, The World Bank, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  12. Panel on the Use of Microcomputers for Developing Countries, 1986. Microcomputers and their Applications for Developing Countries, Westview Press, Boulder and London.Google Scholar
  13. Renaud, Bertrand, 1981, “National Urbanization Policy in Developing Countries,” A World Bank Research Publication, Oxford University Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  14. Richardson, Harry, W., 1977, “City Size and National Spatial Strategies in Developing Countries,” World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 252, The World Bank, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  15. Richardson, Harry W., 1985, “Spatial Strategies, the Settlement Pattern, and Shelter and Services Policies,” Paper Prepared forGoogle Scholar
  16. IYSH Advisory Group Meeting on Shelter, Settlement and Economic Development, United Nations Headquarters, 24–26 April.Google Scholar
  17. Roth, Gabriel, 1987, “The Private Provision of Public Services in Developing Countries,” EDI Series in Economic Development, Published for the World Bank by Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  18. United Nations, “Estimates and Projections of Urban, Rural and City Populations, 1950–2025: The 1982 Assessment,” Department of International and Social Affairs, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  19. World Bank, 1986, Urban development: Thinking Big Enough? in: The Urban Edge, Vol. 10, No. 2, February, The World Bank, Washington, DC.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Thomas Kingsley
    • 1
  1. 1.The Urban InstituteUSA

Personalised recommendations