The Impact of Recombinant DNA Techniques on the Study of Enzymes

  • John R. Coggins
Part of the Progress in Mathematics book series (NSSA)

Abstract

Enzymologists have long dreamed of being able to change individual amino acid residues in enzymes in order to study their contribution to catalysis or substrate binding or regulation. Despite intensive research efforts over the past 40 years this cannot yet be achieved either by the total chemical synthesis of the enzyme protein, nor is it easy to achieve by site-specific chemical modification. However the recent dramatic advances in molecular biology have made it possible. Purposely modified enzymes can now be prepared by combining the new techniques of manipulating DNA in vitro with enzymes (so called recombinant DNA techniques) with oligonucleotide chemistry. This has lead to the development of the new science of enzyme engineering. Besides providing a systematic means of manipulating enzyme structure recombinant DNA techniques have also revolutionised enzymology in two other important ways. Firstly it is now possible to produce large quantities of known but previously inaccessible enzymes by the cloning and overexpression of their genes. Secondly the misery has been taken out of the determination of primary structure since sequencing the DNA of cloned genes is very much faster than sequencing the enzymes as proteins.

Keywords

Protein Engineering Gene Library Synthetic Oligonucleotide Enzyme Engineering Protein Engineer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Coggins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowScotland

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