Expression and Development of Macrophage Activation for Tumor Cytotoxicity

  • William J. Johnson
  • Scott D. Somers
  • Dolph O. Adams
Part of the Contemporary Topics in Immunobiology book series (CTI, volume 13)

Abstract

Mononuclear phagocytes of the tissues, when exposed to the numerous humoral mediators found at sites of inflammation, and particularly when exposed to lymphokines, undergo profound alterations in their cellular physiology (for review, see Adams and Marino, 1984). These intricate, tightly coordinated changes in metabolism and structure, broadly termed activation even though they are often defined in more restrictive ways, are essential to the contributions made by mononuclear phagocytes in maintenance of homeostasis, in metabolism of endogenous and exogenous toxins, in regulation of inflammation, and in the immune response and defense against tumors and microbes. Since the metabolic consequences of inductive signals leading to activation are extremely complex, examination of macrophage activation for a single function can provide a useful model for studying the cell biology of activation (Adams and Marino, 1984).

Keywords

Macrophage Activation Tumor Target Mononuclear Phagocyte Selective Binding Primed Macrophage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Johnson
    • 1
  • Scott D. Somers
    • 1
  • Dolph O. Adams
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PathologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Pathology and Microbiology-ImmunologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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