Magnetoencephalographic Signals and Their Registration

  • K.-H. Berthel
  • G. Albrecht
  • G. Kirsch
  • H. Nowak
  • F. Gießler
Part of the Brain Dynamics book series (BD)

Summary

High resolution magnetoencephalography can play an important role in the extension and the deepening of the electroencephalographic method if a sufficient suppression of outer perturbation signals, especially at low frequencies, can be realized during the investigations of slow activity changes of the brain.

As an alternative solution for the shielded chamber, a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) gradiometer is put forward. This device was developed for making accurate measurements in an unshielded “near-bed” environment. The excellent performance of a five-channel device equipped with a balanceable second-order gradiometer and high-sensitivity SQUIDs will be demonstrated on the basis of magnetocardiographic measurements and preliminary magnetoencephalographic results.

Keywords

Alpha Wave Squid System Slow Potential Change Awake Rabbit Ground Magnetic Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • K.-H. Berthel
  • G. Albrecht
  • G. Kirsch
  • H. Nowak
  • F. Gießler

There are no affiliations available

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