Reaction of Antibodies to Human Milk Fat Globule(HMFG) with Synthetic Peptides

  • Pei X. Xing
  • Kerry Reynolds
  • Joe J. Tjandra
  • Xi L. Tang
  • Damian F. J. Purcell
  • Ian F. C. McKenzie

Abstract

In the last decade many efforts have been made to produce monoclonal antibodies which react specifically with breast cancer, but not with normal tissue. Most of the antibodies selected appear to react with mammary mucins — whether immunizations were done with fresh breast cancer tissue or metastases, cell lines, or with crude or purified extracts of human milk fat globule(HMFG). These antibodies share many characteristics, such as a preferential reaction with mammary tumours and weak reaction with normal tissue; almost all react with adenocarcinomas of other origin, e.g. pancreas, colon and lung; and most react with high molecular weight mucins(Mr>200,000), although reactions with lower molecular weight components(e.g. 70,000) have also been found on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) analysis1–6.

Keywords

Synthetic Peptide Lower Molecular Weight Component Reactive Epitope Direct Binding Assay Short Synthetic Peptide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pei X. Xing
    • 1
  • Kerry Reynolds
    • 1
  • Joe J. Tjandra
    • 1
  • Xi L. Tang
    • 1
  • Damian F. J. Purcell
    • 1
  • Ian F. C. McKenzie
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Centre for Cancer and Transplantion Department of PathologyThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia

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