Typhoid Fever

  • Richard B. Hornick

Abstract

Typhoid fever is a uniquely human systemic infection caused primarily by Salmonella typhi (a few other strains of Salmonella also can cause typhoid fever or enteric fever). A protracted, debilitating febrile illness characterizes the clinical course in untreated patients. The mental cloudiness or stupor associated with this type of chronic illness accounts for the name typhoid, meaning stuporlike. The disease is acquired by ingestion of food or water that has been contaminated by a human who has acute disease, is recently convalescent, or is an asymptomatic chronic fecal shedder of typhoid bacilli. In areas of the world where safe water supplies and good sewage control are not available, typhoid fever remains an endemic disease. The disease is no longer common in the United States; this low prevalence has created a potential public-health problem, i.e., a large population that has become highly susceptible to infection. Thus, travelers to endemic areas account for over half the cases of typhoid fever reported in this country. And as long as some carriers exist, this disease will remain a threat to cause outbreaks when sanitation measures break down and water contamination results . Patients’ illnesses can be easily controlled by appropriate and early institution of antibiotic therapy. Since the disease is rare and becoming more so, delays in diagnosis due to unfamiliarity with the clinical presentation have produced and will continue to produce unnecessary morbidity. (52)

Keywords

Endemic Area Attack Rate Typhoid Fever Enteric Infection Typhoid Vaccine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard B. Hornick
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Education AdministrationOrlando Regional Medical CenterOrlandoUSA

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