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Inertial and Satellite Positioning Surveys

  • David F. Mezera
  • Larry D. Hothem

Abstract

Geodetic control networks have classically been divided into two distinct categories: (1) horizontal and (2) vertical. Each network has its own respective set of monumented points—i.e., horizontal control (or “triangulation”) stations and bench marks in horizontal and vertical networks, respectively. Similarly, classical control surveying methods are divided into two nearly independent categories: (1) horizontal methods that include traversing (Chapter 8), triangulation (Chapter 10), trilateration (Chapter 11), and combinations of the three; and (2) vertical methods that consist of differential and trigonometric leveling (Chapter 6).

Keywords

Global Position System Global Position System Receiver Global Position System Satellite Geodetic Control Inertial Platform 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • David F. Mezera
  • Larry D. Hothem

There are no affiliations available

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