Abstract

One of the striking differences in nutrition between fish and farm animals is that the amount of energy required for protein synthesis is much less for fish than for warmblooded food animals, as is shown in Table 1.1 in the preceding chapter (see page 6). Fish have a lower dietary energy requirement because they do not have to maintain a constant body temperture; they exert relatively less energy to maintain position and to move in water than do mammals and birds on land; and, they lose less energy in protein catabolism and excretion of nitrogenous wastes than land animals because they excrete most of their nitrogenous wastes as ammonia through the gills.

Keywords

Rainbow Trout Common Carp Pantothenic Acid Channel Catfish Thiamin Deficiency 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tom Lovell
    • 1
  1. 1.Auburn UniversityUSA

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