Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders

  • Carol K. Whalen

Abstract

Everybody probably knows at least one child considered hyperactive, and this child is most likely to be a schoolaged boy.1 These youngsters often behave impulsively, acting before thinking, a pattern that may lead both to social friction and to academic failure. They have difficulty focusing on a single activity and often shift erratically from one task to another without finishing either one. Many of these children tend not to maintain the behavior expected of them for more than a few minutes—whether this involves sustained attention and focused effort, cordial social commerce, or age-appropriate control of verbal and motoric impulses. They seem to have remarkably high energy levels, approaching activities with striking and sometimes formidable intensity. Their social visibility is high, as are their demands for attention, sensation, and gratification. But they play by different rules, constrained neither by consistency nor by conventionality.

Keywords

Oppositional Defiant Disorder Normal Child Lead Level Child Psychology Conduct Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol K. Whalen
    • 1
  1. 1.Program in Social EcologyUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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