Final Report of Experimental Psychology Group

  • G. Johanssen
  • N. Moray
  • R. Pew
  • J. Rasmussen
  • A. Sanders
  • C. Wickens
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 8)

Abstract

The origin of the concept of “mental workload” is in the ordinary everyday experience of human beings who perform tasks which are not necessarily physically demanding but which are experienced nonetheless as exhausting and stressful. The concept reflects a genuine dimension or dimensions of human experience in daily work, including — perhaps especially — modern automatic and semi-automatic man-machine systems. As such it is a concept absolutely required for the adequate analysis and description of such tasks and for predicting, at the design stage, the future performance of such systems, and also to allow for the needs and properties of the human operator.

Keywords

Final Report Human Operator Single Channel Task Demand Secondary Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Bainbridge, L. 1974 in Lee F.and Edwards, E. The Human Operator in Process Control. Taylor and Francis. London.Google Scholar
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  4. Norman, D. & Bobraw, D. 1975. On data-limited-resource limited processes. Cognitive Psychology, 7, 44–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Sheridan, T. 1970. On how often the Supervisor should sample. IEEE, SCC-6, 140–145.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Johanssen
  • N. Moray
  • R. Pew
  • J. Rasmussen
  • A. Sanders
  • C. Wickens

There are no affiliations available

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