Fundamental Information

  • M. L. Parsons
  • B. W. Smith
  • G. E. Bentley

Abstract

In order to fully understand atomic spectroscopy it is necessary to know the parameters which determine the signal and the parameters which control the precision, i.e. the noise, of the technique. The equations presented are intended to acquaint the reader with these fundamental expressions. Overall these expressions are not difficult, in fact, the mathematics consists of simple algebra. One can obtain quite a bit of useful information from a study of these expressions. For instance, information as to whether the analytical signal is directly or inversely related to a particular parameter or is more complex. This is readily apparent from a study of these expressions. The same information is obtainable from the noise expressions. Of course the affect of the parameters on both the signal and the noise must be considered. It should also be remembered that the fundamental expressions do not help us with matrix problems except as they relate to the noise expressions.

Keywords

Line Width Government Printing Bond Dissociation Energy Fundamental Information Noise Expression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. L. Parsons
    • 1
  • B. W. Smith
    • 1
  • G. E. Bentley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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