Potential Substrates for Single Cell Protein Production

  • J. C. Royer
  • J. P. Nakas
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 67)

Abstract

Due to a rapidly increasing world population, and frequent food shortages, considerable interest has developed in the use of microbial biomass as a food supplement for animal or human consumption. The cultivation of microorganisms has great potential as a food source because of high nutritional value (Table I), high growth rate (Table II), ability to grow on a wide variety of relatively inexpensive carbon and nitrogen sources, and amenability to genetic engineering. Controlled fermentations have an additional advantage over traditional agriculture in that they are not subject to variability in weather conditions and can be implemented in most geographical locations (Moo-Young et al. 1977). Major international conferences on the use of microbial biomass for food were held at MIT in 1967 and 1973, and it was in 1967 that the term “Single Cell Protein” (SCP) was coined to describe microbial biomass of any origin.

Keywords

Microbial Biomass Sugar Cane Bagasse Cellulase Enzyme Swine Manure Percent Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. Royer
    • 1
  • J. P. Nakas
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Environmental Science and ForestryState University of New YorkSyracuseUSA

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