Nutrition and Metabolism of the Squirrel Monkey

  • Lynne M. Ausman
  • Daniel L. Gallina
  • Robert J. Nicolosi

Abstract

Feeding and foraging occupy a large percentage of time for the squirrel monkey. Animals have been reported to consume a variety of natural foods, including nuts, fruits, seeds, leaves, and insects. These data have been collected from visual observation of materials that enter the animal’s mouth, from studying the stomach contents of primates that have been collected, from identification of damage done to surrounding fauna and flora, and from studying the contents of fecal material left from the animals (Brodie and Marshall, 1963a,b; Fooden, 1964; Thorington, 1968, 1970). With these techniques, however, it is difficult to quantitate the nutrient intakes over long periods of time and it is impossible to make estimates of the mean calorie, protein, vitamin, and mineral intakes of these animals.

Keywords

Nonhuman Primate Squirrel Monkey World Monkey Liquid Diet Plasma Cholesterol Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynne M. Ausman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Daniel L. Gallina
    • 3
  • Robert J. Nicolosi
    • 4
  1. 1.School of NutritionTufts UniversityMedfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of NutritionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of NutritionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  4. 4.New England Regional Primate Research Center, Nutrition DivisionHarvard Medical SchoolSouthboroughUSA

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