Over-the-Counter (OTC) Drugs and Some Prescription Drugs

  • Marc A. Schuckit
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Almost any substance has the potential for abuse (if we define abuse as the voluntary intake to the point of causing physical or psychological harm). l,2 As discussed in Chapter 1, this potential is especially true if the drug has the capacity for altering an individual’s perception of his environment. In this chapter, brief mention will be made of the misuse of some prescription drugs, including the antiparkinsonian medications, diuretics, and antipsychotics. However, the focus is on the over-the-counter (OTC) drugs.

Keywords

Toxic Reaction Nonprescription Drug Overdose Death Organic Brain Syndrome Central Nervous System Stimulant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc A. Schuckit
    • 1
  1. 1.San Diego School of Medicine, Veterans Administration HospitalUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA

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