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Guanidines pp 353-363 | Cite as

Evaluation of the Efficacy of Anti-Rejection Therapy Using the Quantitative Analysis of Guanidinoacetic Acid (GAA) Urinary Excretion as a Guide

  • Makoto Ishizaki
  • Hiroshi Kitamura
  • Hisashi Takahashi
  • Hisako Asano
  • Kazuaki Miura
  • Hajime Okazaki

Abstract

Due to insufficient recognition of rejection crises in kidney transplants, rejection of grafts is a common complication. When it is difficult to make diagnoses using conventional biochemical parameters, histopathological studies of grafts have been undertaken to clarify the clinical events. Even in cases of successful biopsies, consecutive procedures are not possible. Therefore, since the urinary excretion of GAA reflects the metabolic functioning of the kidney, we examined the daily level of GAA in urine after transplantation and considered the feasibility of using this measure as a guide to the early detection of rejection and whether or not the amount of GAA urinary excretion could contribute to the evaluation of the efficacy as well as the sufficiency of anti-rejection therapy.

Keywords

Acute Rejection Acute Tubular Necrosis Living Related Donor Severe Rejection Guanidino Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Makoto Ishizaki
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Kitamura
    • 1
  • Hisashi Takahashi
    • 1
  • Hisako Asano
    • 1
  • Kazuaki Miura
    • 1
  • Hajime Okazaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Sendai Shakai-Hoken HospitalSendaiJapan

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