Guanidines pp 317-325 | Cite as

Metabolic Changes of Guanidino Compounds in Acute Renal Failure Complicated with Hepatic Disease

  • Yōji Ochiai
  • Rikiya Matsuda
  • Kyōko Nishitani
  • Yoshinori Kōsogabe
  • Shinya Abe
  • Yoshitarō Itano
  • Teruo Yamada
  • Futami Kosaka

Abstract

Acute uremia may be associated with increased arginine (ARG) utilization and increased synthesis of urea. Perez et al.1 demonstrated an increased synthesis of guanidinosuccinic acid (GSA) by livers of acutely uremic rats. We found clinical evidence that in actual cases of acute renal failure (ARF) complicated with hepatic disease, concentrations of guanidino compounds (GC) vary from those seen in ARF without hepatic disease.2 The present study was designed to examine the metabolic relationship of liver to kidney and to investigate the effect of renal and hepatic function on the metabolism of ARG and other urea cycle intermediates. In this study, we compare GC concentrations in ARF without hepatic disease with those in ARF with hepatic disease by the use of guanidinograms, which are circle diagrams composed of eight GC.

Keywords

Acute Renal Failure Hepatic Disease Carbamyl Phosphate Urea Cycle Enzyme Ornithine Carbamoyltransferase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yōji Ochiai
    • 1
  • Rikiya Matsuda
    • 1
  • Kyōko Nishitani
    • 2
  • Yoshinori Kōsogabe
    • 1
  • Shinya Abe
    • 2
  • Yoshitarō Itano
    • 2
  • Teruo Yamada
    • 2
  • Futami Kosaka
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Intensive Care UnitOkayama University HospitalOkayama 700Japan
  2. 2.Department of AnesthesiologyOkayama University Medical schoolOkayama 700Japan

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