Guanidines pp 119-124 | Cite as

Topographical Distribution of Sheep Brain Arginase: Its Response to Some Guanidino Compounds

  • V. Mohanachari
  • K. Satyavelu Reddy
  • K. Indira
  • K. S. Swami

Abstract

Despite several reports on the role of guanidines in the neurological symptoms of epilepsy, hyperargininemia and renal failure1–3, many points are still unclear and a need for studies on the direct toxic effects of guanidines was indicated in the symposium on urea cycle diseases2. Though there is a clear metabolic interrelation between arginine and guanidines, the whole metabolic profile appears complicated in the mammalian brain due to a) the lack of a functional urea cycle b) the presence of complex regional differences and c) the unknown functional significance of arginase4. Hence, these metabolic uncertainities have prompted the authors to take up a study of the topographical distribution of mammalian brain arginase and its response to some guanidines, in vitro, in order to assess the direct neurotoxic nature of these compounds.

Keywords

Urea Cycle Guanidine Hydrochloride Arginase Activity Topographical Distribution Post Natal Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Mohanachari
    • 1
  • K. Satyavelu Reddy
    • 1
  • K. Indira
    • 1
  • K. S. Swami
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologySri Venkateswara UniversityTirupatiIndia

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