New High-Speed Fully Automated Guanidino Compound Analyzer

  • Sakae Higashidate
  • Tetsuya Maekubo
  • Muneo Saito
  • Masaaki Senda
  • Tadao Hoshino

Abstract

The introduction of dialysis has made rapid progress in the field of research and clinical treatment of renal failure, and has contributed very much to physiological elucidation of uremia. In uremia, concentrations of serum creatinine, BUN (Blood urea nitrogen), uric acid and guanidino compounds increase, and abnormalities of water, electrolytes, and acid-base equilibrium are seen. In addition, there are still many unknown substances and unknown factors, which play an important role in this disease. These substances are generally called uremic toxins. It is essential to investigate uremic toxins for the elucidation of uremia and the establishment of proper dialysis. Many compounds from low molecular weight to middle molecular weight have been investigated as suspicious candidates for the uremic toxin. Among these compounds, guanidines such as methylguanidine (MG), guanidinosuccinic acid (GSA) and guanidine (G) have been suggested. These guanidino compounds are also considered as causes for abnormalities in brain metabolism.

Keywords

Peritoneal Dialysis Uremic Patient Uremic Toxin JASCO Model Guanidino Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sakae Higashidate
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Maekubo
    • 1
  • Muneo Saito
    • 1
  • Masaaki Senda
    • 1
  • Tadao Hoshino
    • 2
  1. 1.JASCOJapan Spectroscopic Co., Ltd.Hachioji City, Tokyo 192Japan
  2. 2.Pharmaceutical Institute, School of MedicineKeio UniversityTokyo 160Japan

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