Controlled-Release Formulations and Their Use in Insect Crop Protection

  • Norman L. Gauthier

Abstract

The use of chemical and biorational pesticides formulated into various powdered, solid, or liquid products represents the basis of our present crop protection programs. The use of any pesticide under field conditions is subject to many factors which regulate efficacy and residuality. Biological compounds may have high selectivity but show low persistence or half-life under field conditions and may be relatively unstable to sunlight or oxidants.l With application of insecticides to the soil, additional loss and poor persistence may be caused by hydrolysis, volatilization, leaching, differential photo decomposition, or other deactivation of the toxicant. Detailed tests by Read2 demonstrated that most pesticide materials placed on the soil surface were initially highly toxic but showed a continuous and relatively rapid loss of toxicity. In soil insect control for corn, potatoes, and other crops, granular formulations are widely used as banded or broadcast applications. Type and method of application of a pesticide also affects toxicity. With a given insect such as cabbage root maggot, banded treatments of insecticide granules were shown to be more effective than broadcast treatments.3 However, granular insecticide formulations are not just limited to soil applications. Lynch, et a1.4 obtained excellent control of European corn borer with granular Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner formulations. In these tests, granules were significantly more effective than sprays in providing borer control. Method of application, insecticide selectivity, placement of toxicant, type of application, and formulation used: all influence degree of control obtained.

Keywords

Sweet Corn Insect Control European Corn Borer Flea Beetle Granular Formulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman L. Gauthier
    • 1
  1. 1.Agway Inc.SyracuseUSA

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