Fibrous Polymers for the Delivery of Contraceptive Steroids to the Female Reproductive Tract

  • Richard L. Dunn
  • Danny H. Lewis
  • Lee R. Beck

Abstract

Research and development on the application of controlled-release technology to fertility regulation was initiated in the late 1960s and has been accelerated in recent years.12 Since sustained-release doses obviate the problem of cyclic overdosing and underdosing associated with the conventional administration of steroids, the technology, in principle, affords a means of effecting an optimum pharmacological response with a minimum dose of exogenous steroid.3 Depending upon the half-life of the drug in plasma, the duration of the dose regimen, and the route of administration, the total dose can be reduced to 1/100 or less for continuous versus intermittant delivery.

Keywords

Female Reproductive Tract Contraceptive Steroid Sheath Thickness Polyethylene Fiber Core Matrix 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard L. Dunn
    • 1
  • Danny H. Lewis
    • 1
  • Lee R. Beck
    • 2
  1. 1.Southern Research InstituteBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Alabama in BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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