Insulin Binding by Cultured Fibroblasts from Normal and Insulin-Resistant Subjects

  • A. L. Rosenbloom
  • S. Goldstein
  • C. C. Yip
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB)

Abstract

The major advantage of cultured fibroblasts (CF) for the study of genetic regulatory aspects of insulin binding is the unrestricted use of stable diploid human cells several generations removed from neuro-humoral influences. CF were grown to confluence in 100 mm plastic dishes, 6–10 subcultures after harvesting from skin ex-plants. Donors included 11 nondiabetic controls aged three months to 70 years, four children two to nine years old with precocious tissue degeneration--three with Progeria (Rosenbloom and DeBusk, 1971) and one with Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome (Blinstrub, Lehman, and Steinberg, 1964)--and three persons ages 15, 19, and 30 years with lipoatrophic diabetes (LD). LD is a condition characterized by extremely high circulating insulin levels and resistance to the effects of massive doses of injected insulin (Flier, Kahn, Roth, and Bar, 1975).

Keywords

Insulin Receptor Culture Fibroblast Insulin Binding Negative Cooperativity Nondiabetic Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. L. Rosenbloom
    • 3
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Goldstein
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. C. Yip
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine, Biochemistry, and PediatricsMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  2. 2.Banting and Best Institute of the University of TorontoCanada
  3. 3.Division of Genetics, Endocrinology, and Metabolism; Department of PediatricsUniversity of Florida College of MedicineGainesvilleUSA

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