Muconaldehyde, A Potential Toxic Intermediate of Benzene Metabolism

  • Bernard D. Goldstein
  • Gisela Witz
  • Jamshid Javid
  • Marie A. Amoruso
  • Toby Rossman
  • Bonnie Wolder
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB)

Abstract

The metabolite of benzene that is responsible for its hematological toxicity is unknown. Benzene is of course the parent aromatic hydrocarbon and mush attention has been focussed on classical pathways of aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism in the search for toxic benzene metabolites. Elegant studies by a number of groups, including work presented at this symposium by Snyder, Irons, and Tunek, have evaluated metabolites such as benzene oxide, catechol, phenol, hydroquinone and their derivatives (See reviews by Snyder et al, 1977; Laskin and Goldstein, 1977). While there are some interesting clues concerning potentially toxic intermediates, and much important information has been obtained, the metabolic pathway and agent(s) responsible for the hematological toxicity of benzene remains unidentified.

Keywords

Hemoglobin Synthesis Muconic Acid Peroxidized Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Benzene Oxide Isobutane Chemical Ionization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernard D. Goldstein
    • 1
  • Gisela Witz
    • 1
  • Jamshid Javid
    • 2
  • Marie A. Amoruso
    • 1
  • Toby Rossman
    • 2
  • Bonnie Wolder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental and Community MedicineCMDNJ-Rutgers Medical SchoolPiscatawayUSA
  2. 2.New York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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