Alcohol and Bilateral Evoked Brain Potentials

  • Bernice Porjesz
  • Henri Begleiter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 59)

Abstract

Man is cerebrally unique in that he is the only primate with marked functional asymmetry, where the two halves of the brain are specialized to serve separate functions. In most individuals (95%), the left hemisphere plays a dominant role in all language function — speech, verbal perception and thinking, while the right hemisphere dominates non-verbal contents, e.g., form perception and feelings.

Keywords

Left Hemisphere Orange Juice Late Component Electrode Location Early Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernice Porjesz
    • 1
  • Henri Begleiter
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Psychiatry Downstate Medical CenterState University of New YorkBrooklynUSA

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