Alcohol and Secobarbital: Effects on Information Processing

  • K. TharpJr.
  • O. H. RundellJr.
  • Boyd K. Lester
  • Harold L. Williams
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 59)

Abstract

Most published reports of the effects of drugs on human performance have been empirical and task specific rather than theoretical in conception. For example, alcohol and secobarbital both cause impairment on tasks such as time estimation (Rutschman & Rubenstein, 1966), reaction time (Moskowitz & Roth, 1971; Blum, Stern & Melville, 1964) and verbal retention (Jones, 1973; Evans & Davis, 1969). Yet, alcohol and the barbiturates are not identical, pharmacologically; and it is important to discover whether their similar effects on laboratory tasks result from impairment of different or of the same cognitive processes. One way to address this question is to examine drug effects from the perspective of an information processing model.

Keywords

Response Selection Stimulus Discriminability Established Treatment Stimulus Categorization Response Execution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. TharpJr.
    • 1
  • O. H. RundellJr.
    • 1
  • Boyd K. Lester
    • 1
  • Harold L. Williams
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Health Sciences CenterUniversity of OklahomaOklahoma CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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