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Enzymes of Biogenic Aldehyde Metabolism

  • Jean P. von Wartburg
  • Denis Berger
  • Margret M. Ris
  • Boris Tabakoff
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 59)

Abstract

The terms biogenic aldehydes, biogenic alcohols and biogenic acids have been coined (1, 2) to describe the deaminated metabolites of the neurotransmitter amines (i.e. biogenic amines). Much recent evidence indicates that these products have a physiologic role in the CNS. For example, deaminated metabolites of both serotonin (3) and norepinephrine (4) have been theorized to be involved in transitions between REM and slow wave sleep. Serotonin metabolites have also been postulated to control body temperature (5, 6) and sleep-wakefulness (7) in animals. Biogenic aldehydes have been reported to inhibit both Na+ — K+ and Mg++ activated ATP’ases in brain synaptosomes (8). However, the characteristics of the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of biogenic aldehydes, and the factors which may regulate this metabolism in vivo have only recently come under scrutiny (2, 9).

Keywords

Alcohol Dehydrogenase Ethanol Oxidation Ethanol Administration Succinic Semialdehyde Aldehyde Reductase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean P. von Wartburg
    • 1
  • Denis Berger
    • 1
  • Margret M. Ris
    • 1
  • Boris Tabakoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Medizinisch-chemisches InstitutUniversity of BerneBerneSwitzerland

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