Quantitative Interpretation of Transplantation Phenomena

  • Harry K. MacWilliams

Abstract

What is the shape of the head activation gradient in hydra? With what kinetics does the hydra head inhibition change with time after the head is removed? These questions seem to be simple ones, but they require that transplantation phenomena be interpreted quantitatively. In this chapter I discuss some problems that arise when one attempts such interpretations and present what appear to me to be the best methods of dealing with them.

Keywords

Formation Frequency Fundamental Parameter Hill Climbing Inhibition Level Basal Disk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry K. MacWilliams
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnatomyUniversity of Massachusetts Medical CenterWorcesterUSA

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