Crysnet a crystallographic computing network with interactive graphics display

  • E. F. MeyerJr.
  • C. N. Morimoto
  • José Villarreal
  • H. M. Berman
  • H. L. Carrell
  • R. K. Stodola
  • T. F. Koetzle
  • L. C. Andrews
  • F. C. Bernstein
  • H. J. Bernstein
Part of the FASEB Monographs book series (FASEBM, volume 2)

Abstract

More than the simple study of crystals, modern crystallography can be defined as the study of the structure of crystalline matter at or near atomic resolution by means of diffraction of X-rays, neutrons or electrons (15). As a science, crystallography throbs with relevancy (8). Crystallography settled the debate over the chemical form of NaCl (1914), served as a basis for the understanding of the chemical bond (1938), and more recently ushered in the now widely popular field of molecular biology (1953). Within the past 10 years the number of small compounds under study has risen to a current level of about 2,000 reports per year, and equally important, the number, size, and variety of macromolecules under investigation is steadily increasing.

Keywords

Interactive Computer Graphic Crystalline Matter Kinetic Depth Effect Modern Crystallography Intelligent Terminal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. F. MeyerJr.
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. N. Morimoto
    • 1
    • 2
  • José Villarreal
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. M. Berman
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. L. Carrell
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. K. Stodola
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. F. Koetzle
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. C. Andrews
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. C. Bernstein
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. J. Bernstein
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Texas A & M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Cancer ResearchPhiladelphiaUSA

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