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Design, Construction, and Performance of a Laboratory-Size Helium Liquefier

  • D. B. Mann
  • W. R. Bjorklund
  • J. Macinko
  • M. J. Hiza
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 5)

Abstract

To fulfill a need for liquid helium at the Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, a new helium liquefier having a capacity great enough to satisfy present demands for this liquid has been constructed.

Keywords

Pressure Drop Heat Exchanger Liquid Helium Liquid Hydrogen Final Expansion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    P. R. Trumpler and B.F. Dodge, “The design of ribbon-packed exchangers for low temperature air separation plants,” Trans. A.I.Ch.E., Vol. 43, No. 2, pp. 75–84 (1947).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    D. B. Mann and R. B. Stewart, Thermodynamic Properties of Helium at Low Temperatures and High Pressures, NBS Technical Note 8, PB 151367 (1959).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    E. H. Brown and J. W. Dean, “Joule-Thomson process in the liquefaction of helium,” J. Res. National Bureau of Standards Report 2834, Vol. 60, No. 3 (1958).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    R. B. Scott, Cryogenic Engineering, D. Van Nostrand Co., Princeton (1959).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    D. B. Chelton, J. Macinko, and J. W. Dean, NBS Report 5520 (unpublished) (1957).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. B. Mann
    • 1
  • W. R. Bjorklund
    • 1
  • J. Macinko
    • 1
  • M. J. Hiza
    • 1
  1. 1.CEL National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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