Tensile—Compression—Shear Loop for Irradiation Testing at Cryogenic Temperatures

  • W. L. Bridges
  • A. M. Liebschutz
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 7)

Abstract

The mechanical properties of metals and alloys are greatly influenced by the type and concentration of solid-state defects. Such defects, regardless of the method of their production, are capable of moving about if the temperature is sufficiently high. It is by this mechanism that the effects of nuclear irradiation as well as heat treatment or work hardening are annealed out. In most common metals, defects are mobile at temperatures as low as 54°R. Cottrell reports that in high-purity copper, for example, after irradiation below 18°R, most of the change in electrical resistivity anneals out at temperatures below 63°R [1], Thus, it is seen that annealing, even during irradiation, is the rule rather than the exception.

Keywords

Cryogenic Temperature Refrigeration System Test Loop Vacuum Insulation Beam Port 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. 1.
    A. H. Cottrell, Met. Rev., Vol. 1, 479 (1956).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1962

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. L. Bridges
    • 1
  • A. M. Liebschutz
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgia Nuclear LaboratoriesLockheed Aircraft CorporationDawsonvilleUSA

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