The Structure of the Allotropic Forms of He3 and He4

  • A. F. Schuch
  • R. L. Mills
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 7)

Abstract

In 1908 Kamerlingh Onnes first liquefied helium. He observed that it remained liquid, even when cooled as low as 0.83°K, which was his lowest obtainable temperature. He correctly supposed that, if cooled under its own vapor pressure, helium would remain liquid down to absolute zero. The question remained however, whether or not helium could be solidified. Keesom in 1926 found that freezing required a pressure of at least 25 atm. Osborne, Abraham, and Weinstock [1], who in 1951 first solidified the lighter isotope, He3, observed that a similar pressure was needed.

Keywords

Molar Volume Hexagonal Close Packing Close Packed Structure Melting Line Allotropic Form 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1962

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. F. Schuch
    • 1
  • R. L. Mills
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos Scientific LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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