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Properties of Solids

  • Klaus D. Timmerhaus
  • Thomas M. Flynn
Chapter
Part of the The International Cryogenics Monograph Series book series (ICMS)

Abstract

A knowledge of the properties and behavior of materials used in any cryogenic system is essential for proper design considerations. Often the choice of materials for the construction of cryogenic equipment will be dictated by consideration of mechanical and physical properties such as thermal conductivity (heat transfer along a structural member), thermal expansivity (expansion and contraction during cycling between ambient and low temperatures), and density (mass of system). Since properties at low temperatures are often significantly different from those at ambient temperature, there is no substitute for test data. To help summarize the data that do exist and help estimate properties when no data are available, it is useful to have certain general rules in mind. That is the purpose of the following discussion.

Keywords

Thermal Conductivity Fatigue Strength Critical Field Superconducting State Flux Line 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus D. Timmerhaus
    • 1
  • Thomas M. Flynn
    • 2
  1. 1.University of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Ball Aerospace Systems GroupBoulderUSA

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