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Undernutrition and the Developing Brain: The use of Animal Models to Elucidate the Human Problem

  • John Dobbing
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 13)

Abstract

There is no longer any doubt that growth restriction due to malnutrition at certain ages is associated in many children with an irreversible deficit in higher mental function. The phenomenon is by no means confined to the underprivileged communities of developing countries, but can be found, although on a smaller scale, in similar communities in the most advanced country in the world. It may also be allied to the diminished ultimate potential of some low birth weight babies from even the most privileged homes. A constant feature appears to be the need to maintain a good growth rate at least until the eighteenth month of human postnatal life. By contrast, the effects of growth retardation at later ages can apparently be reversed on restoring good dietary and other conditions.

Keywords

Velocity Curve Growth Spurt Brain Weight Brain Growth Vulnerable Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Dobbing
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child HealthUniversity of ManchesterManchester 13England

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