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Analysis of the Promoter of a Human Pepsinogen a Gene

  • P. H. S. Meijerink
  • J. P. Bebelman
  • G. Pals
  • F. Arwert
  • R. J. Planta
  • A. W. Eriksson
  • W. H. Mager
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 306)

Abstract

Pepsinogen A (PGA), inactive precursor of the aspartic proteinase pepsin A (E.C. 3.4.23.1), is encoded on the human genome (chromosome 11ql2-13) by a multigene family1. Electrophoretic separation of the PGA isozymogens from urine or gastric mucosa reveals three main fractions: Pg3, Pg4 and Pg5. The electrophoretic patterns of PGA show a large, genetically-determined, inter-individual heterogeneity. These differences can be explained by the presence of a number of haplotypes, containing different numbers and types of PGA genes2. The study of PGA gene clusters by RFLP analysis previously enabled us to define the haplotypes corresponding to certain phenotypes3. In this paper we describe part of our studies aimed at identifying cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in the tissue-specific transcriptional regulation of PGA gene expression.

Keywords

Footprint Analysis Band Shift Assay Gastric Fundic Mucosa Porcine Gastric Mucosa Gastric Chief Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. H. S. Meijerink
    • 1
  • J. P. Bebelman
    • 1
  • G. Pals
    • 1
  • F. Arwert
    • 1
  • R. J. Planta
    • 2
  • A. W. Eriksson
    • 1
  • W. H. Mager
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Human GeneticsVrije UniversiteitAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Biochemical DepartmentVrije UniversiteitAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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