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Development of oFSH as a Vaccine for the Male — A Status Report on the Recent Reasearches Carried Out Using the Bonnet Monkey (M. Radiata)

  • N. R. Moudgal
  • G. S. Murthy
  • A. J. Rao
  • N. Ravindranath
  • M. R. Sairam
  • S. G. Kotagi
  • F. Martin
Chapter
Part of the Reproductive Biology book series (RBIO)

Abstract

It is currently accepted that immunocontraception is a feasible procedure for the female. The possibility of using such an approach in the male is still under experimental manipulation. Among the different immunogens suggested three antigens — one tissue specific and two hormonally based appear promising and as such are currently being tested. Development of any contraceptive for the male has to contend with the effect it may have on testosterone production and consequently libido. Most hormonally based contraceptives under development for the male therefore advocate supplementation with an androgen. The one exception to this appears to be FSH. The observation that FSH is involved in regulating sperm production and fertility of the adult male primate in itself is of recent origin. It was shown in 1979 that continuous neutralization of endogenous FSH of proven fertile adult male bonnet monkeys over a period of 90–230 days with characterized FSH antibody effects testicular funcion, the monkeys becoming infertile as a consequence of it1–4. Such neutralization, however, did not effect testosterone production or libido. This basic observation particularly with respect to the effect passive immunization with FSH antiserum produces on the quality and quantity of sperm production was soon confirmed using the rhesus5 and cynomolgous6 monkeys. Yet another evidence for the involvement of FSH in regulating testicular function of the adult male primate was obtained recently by chronically dosing adult proven fertile male bonnet monkeys with an ovine testicular inhibin preparation.

Keywords

Passive Immunization Sperm Production Testicular Function Bonnet Monkey Total Sperm Count 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. R. Moudgal
    • 1
  • G. S. Murthy
    • 1
  • A. J. Rao
    • 1
  • N. Ravindranath
    • 1
  • M. R. Sairam
    • 2
  • S. G. Kotagi
    • 1
  • F. Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Advanced Research in Reproductive Biology Laboratory of Endocrine BiochemistryIndian Institute of ScienceBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.Reproduction Research laboratoryClinical Research Institute of MontrealMontrealCanada

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