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Implications of Altered Hemoglobin Concentration with Variations in Oxygen Consumption, Arterial Oxygen Saturation, and Age Based on a Mathematical Model for the Utilization of Reserve Oxygen Transport Capacity

  • Kevin Farrell
  • Robert Bowen
  • John Beatty
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 180)

Abstract

The optimal hemoglobin concentration in critically ill patients has remained controversial with levels from 10 to 15 grams % being recommended.1,2,3,4 with this in mind a previously described mathematical model for the percent utilization of reserve oxygen transport* capacity (% URO2TC)5 was used to examine the interrelationships of hemoglobin concentration, cardiac output, oxygen consumption (V̇O2), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), and age with the % URO2TC. The model is a set of five equations that interrelate two sets of values for oxygen delivery (DO2) and VO2 with the % URO2TC.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin Farrell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert Bowen
    • 1
    • 2
  • John Beatty
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUMDNJ/Rutgers Medical School at CamdenCamdenUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnesthesiologyWest Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA

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