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Regulation of Macrophage Production

  • Donald Metcalf
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 155)

Abstract

In parallel with the production of other hemopoietic cells, macrophage production is continuous throughout adult life. As shown in Figure 1, the production of tissue macrophages is the end result of a sequential series of events in which, (a) multipotential stem cells (colony forming units, spleen, CFU-S) generate progenitor cells committed to granulocyte and monocyte production (GM-colony forming cells, GM-CFC), (b) individual progenitor cells generate clones of progeny cells that progressively lose the capacity for further division and generate maturing monocytes, (c) monocytes are released to the circulation from the marrow and spleen, (d) circulating monocytes seed in the tissues either to die or to form relatively long-lived tissue macrophages, some of which have a limited proliferative capacity and (e) limited recirculation of tissue macrophages occurs between different organs.

Keywords

Progenitor Cell Hemopoietic Cell Macrophage Production Normal Adult Mouse Macrophage Precursor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald Metcalf
    • 1
  1. 1.Cancer Research Unit The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical ResearchPost Office Royal Melbourne HospitalAustralia

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