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Extraretinal Photoreception

Chapter

Abstract

Light plays many roles in the lives of organisms other than that which we normally associate with the visual perception of patterns in the environment. Therefore, it is useful to distinguish between those situations in which (1) light is important to organisms primarily because of its energy content, and (2) light functions as a signal, stimulus, or “trigger” and, from a biological viewpoint, energetic considerations are secondary.

Keywords

Circadian Rhythm Circadian Clock Light Cycle House Sparrow Constant Light 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ZoologyThe University of TexasAustinUSA

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