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Photomovement

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Abstract

Photomovement may be described as any light-mediated behavioral act involving the spatial displacement of all or part of an organism. In order to understand better what these responses are and how they may be studied, we must first classify, or at least define, their basic characteristics. The scheme described here is the result of the better part of two centuries of work and is best summarized in the classic study of Fraenkel and Gunn.(1)

Keywords

Light Stimulus Oriented Response Euglena Gracilis Canary Grass Marine Dinoflagellate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of BiologyOccidental CollegeLos AngelesUSA

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