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Estrogen Receptors as Nuclear Proteins

  • Jack Gorski
  • Jeffrey C. Hansen
  • Wade V. Welshons
Chapter
  • 44 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 230)

Abstract

The estrogen receptor appears to be a nuclear protein regardless of whether or not it is occupied by an estrogenic ligand (1). As illustrated in Figure 1, the estrogen receptor is thought to be bound with low affinity to some nuclear component. Thus the unoccupied receptor is not in a soluble form in the intact nucleus but is readily extracted into dilute aqueous buffers upon homogenization. When receptor-containing cells or tissues are exposed to estrogens, the estrogen-receptor complex undergoes a conformational change resulting in an increased affinity for nuclear components. Therefore the estrogen-receptor complex can be extracted only with buffers containing high salt concentrations (0.4 M NaC1). We believe that the estrogen-induced conformational change is the critical event in estrogen action.

Keywords

Estrogen Receptor Glucocorticoid Receptor Nuclear Matrix Growth Hormone Gene Steroid Hormone Action 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Gorski
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jeffrey C. Hansen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wade V. Welshons
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry College of Agricultural and Life SciencesUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Animal Sciences College of Agricultural and Life SciencesUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA

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