Advertisement

Antibodies to Glycosphingolipids in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and SLE

  • T. Endo
  • D. D. Scott
  • S. S. Stewart
  • S. K. Kundu
  • D. M. Marcus
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 174)

Abstract

Antibodies against gangliosides and neutral glycosphingolipids (GSLs) have been reported previously in the sera of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)1-5 and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The specificity of these antibodies has not been examined in detail, and in studies in which a liposome lysis assay was used the lytic factor in serum was not clearly identified as an immunoglobulin. The long term objectives of this study are to characterize the specificity of anti-GSL antibodies, to determine their incidence in immunological and non-immunological diseases that affect the nervous system, and to examine the temporal fluctuation of antibody levels in relation to disease activity. In this report we present our initial findings on the incidence and specificity of anti-GSL antibodies.

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Multiple Sclerosis Patient Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patient Brain Ganglioside 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    M. Yokoyama, E. G. Trams, and R. O. Brady, Sphingolipid antibodies in sera of animals and patients with central nervous system lesions, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 111:350 (1962).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    H. E. Hirsch and M. E. Parks, Serological reactions against glycolipid-sensitised liposomes in multiple sclerosis, Nature 264:785 (1976).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    B. Ryberg, Multiple specificities of antibrain antibodies in multiple sclerosis and chronic myelopathy, J. Neurol. Sci. 38:357 (1978).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    B. R. Mullin, A. J. Montanaro, J. D. Reid, and R. N. Nishimura, Interaction of multiple sclerosis serum with liposomes containing ganglioside GM1, Ann, Neurol. 7:587 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    R. Arnon, E. Crisp, R. Kelley, G. W. Ellison, L. W. Myers, and W. W. Tourtellotte, Anti-ganglioside antibodies in multiple sclerosis, J. Neurol. Sci. 46:179 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    T. Hirano, H. Hasimoto, Y. Shiokawa, M. Iwamori, Y. Nagai, M. Kasai, Y. Ochiai, and K. Okumura, Anti-glycolipid autoantibody detected in the sera from systemic lupus erythematosus patients, J. Clin. Invest. 66:1437 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    M. Naiki, D. M. Marcus, and R. Ledeen, Properties of antisera to ganglioside GM1 and asialo GM1, J. Immunol. 113:84 (1974).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    S. K. Kundu, D. M. Marcus, and R. W. Veh, Preparation and properties of antibodies to GD3 and GM1 gangliosides, J. Neurochem. 34:184 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    M. M. Rapport, L. Graf, Y. L. Huang, W. Brunner, and R. K. Yu, Antibodies to total brain gangliosides: Titer and specificity of antisera, in: “Structure and Function of Gangliosides”, L. Svennerholm, P. Mandel, H. Dreyfus, and P. F. Urban, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1980).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Endo
    • 1
  • D. D. Scott
    • 1
  • S. S. Stewart
    • 1
  • S. K. Kundu
    • 1
  • D. M. Marcus
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, and NeurologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA

Personalised recommendations