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Glycosphingolipids of Chicken Skeletal Muscle in Early Development and Genetic Dystrophy

  • Edward L. Hogan
  • Jaw-Long Chien
  • Somsankar Dasgupta
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 174)

Abstract

Our systematic characterization of the glycosphingolipids (GSL) of chicken skeletal muscle has revealed gangliosides of the lactosyl- (GM3, GD3), lactosylneotetraosyl- or lactosaminyl-(MG-IV*, MG-VI), ganglio- (GDla, GT1) and globo-(MG-V, DG-V) series. In fact, these latter globo-gangliosides were the first gangliosides described that contained the globoside oligosaccharide sequence.1, 3 The major neutral GSL in chicken muscle of the Leghorn strain is the Forssman hapten pentaglycosylceramide.4

Keywords

Muscular Dystrophy Pectoral Muscle Dystrophic Muscle Chicken Muscle Major Ganglioside 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward L. Hogan
    • 1
  • Jaw-Long Chien
    • 1
  • Somsankar Dasgupta
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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