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Ganglioside Biosynthesis in Rat Liver Golgi Apparatus: Stimulation by Phosphatidylglycerol and Inhibition by Tunicamycin

  • Harun K. M. Yusuf
  • Gottfried Pohlentz
  • Günter Schwarzmann
  • Konrad Sandhoff
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 174)

Abstract

Gangliosides are synthesized mainly in membranes in a stepwise manner by the sequential addition of individual sugars to the growing glycolipid (for review see ref. 1). A prerequisite for glycoconjugate biosynthesis in the inner compartment of the Golgi2–5 is the entrance of sugar nucleotides from the cytosol where they are synthesized.6–7 Recently Hirschberg and associates described experimental evidence for a carrier mediated transport of CMP-NeuAc and GDP-Fuc.

Keywords

Sugar Nucleotide Golgi Membrane Uridine Diphosphate Golgi Vesicle Carrier Mediate Transport 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

CMP-NeuAc

cytidine 5′monophospho-N-acetylneura-minic acid

GDP-Fuc

guanosine 5′-diphosphofucose

PG

phospha-tidylglycerol

GM1

II3Neu5AcGgOse4Cer

GM2

II3Neu5AcGgOse3Cer

GM3

II3Neu5AcLacCer

GD3

II3(Neu5Ac)2LacCer

GDla

IV3, II3 (Neu5Ac)2GgOse4Cer

UDP-GalNAc

uridine 5′-diphospho-2-deoxy-2-acetamido-galactopyranose

TLC

thin layer chromatography

Dol-P

dolichylphosphate

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harun K. M. Yusuf
    • 1
  • Gottfried Pohlentz
    • 1
  • Günter Schwarzmann
    • 1
  • Konrad Sandhoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Organische Chemie und BiochemieUniversität BonnBonn 1Germany

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