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Regulation of Microflow in the Cat Brain During Insulin Induced Hypoglycemia

  • E. Leniger-Follert
  • J. Gronczewski
  • C. Danz
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 169)

Abstract

It is well established that severe hypoglycemia is accompanied by changes in cerebral functional activity and by a decrease in the cerebral metabolism of glucose. The results published on cerebral blood flow (CBF) during hypoglycemia are, however, controversial. Whereas most authors reported constant CBF, Norberg and Siesjö (1976) demonstrated in rats that CBF increased significantly both when the EEG showed a pattern of slow waves and polyspikes and when electrical activity ceased.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Brain Cortex Severe Hypoglycemia Measuring Electrode Insulin Induce Hypoglycemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Leniger-Follert
    • 1
  • J. Gronczewski
    • 1
  • C. Danz
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für SystemphysiologieDortmund 1Germany

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