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Changes in Cerebral Oxygen Tension and Red Cell Content on Sensory Stimulation

  • I. S. Longmuir
  • J. A. Knopp
  • J. L. Pittman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 169)

Abstract

According to current studies, the cerebral cortical circulation shows well developed “oxygen autoregulation” to the extent that local increases in oxygen consumption in the sensory cortex produced by peripheral stimulation are accompanied by increases in blood flow so finely adjusted that no local changes in Po2 can be detected (Leniger-Follert and Hossmann, 1979). If indeed there is no local fall in Po2, then hypoxia cannot be the signal for increased blood flow, and it is necessary to postulate some other mechanism similar to the old “axon reflex” to account for this type of autoregulation. However, if the signal involves a change in Po2 in a very small volume, perhaps a single neurone and occurring for a period of less than one second, then Polarographic electrodes might not have sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to measure this. With our T. V. system we can measure changes in oxygen tension and microregional red cell mass in cylinders of tissue of 10 um diameter and approximately 150 urn deep with a time resolution of 33 msecs.

Keywords

Oxygen Tension Sensory Stimulation Sensory Cortex Peripheral Stimulation Visible Light Source 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Benson, D.W., Knopp, J.A., and Longmuir, I.S., 1980, Intracellular oxygen measurements of mouse liver cells using quantitative fluorescence video microscopy, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 591: 187.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Eke, A., Hutiray, G., and Kovách, A.G.B., 1979, Induced hemodilution detected by reflectometry for measuring microregional blood flow and blood volume in cat brain cortex, Am. J. Physiol., 236H: 759.Google Scholar
  3. Leniger-Follert, E., and Hossmann, K.-A., 1979, Simultaneous measurements of microflow and evoked potentials in the somatomotor cortex of the cat brain during specific sensory activation, Pflügers Arch., 380: 85.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. S. Longmuir
    • 1
  • J. A. Knopp
    • 1
  • J. L. Pittman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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