Advertisement

The Syndrome of Persistent Generalized Lymphadenopathy: Experience with 101 Patients

  • Michael S. Gottlieb
  • Peter R. Wolfe
  • John L. Fahey
  • Steven Knight
  • David Hardy
  • Lawrence Eppolito
  • Ellyn Ashida
  • Amit Patel
  • Gildon N. Beall
  • Nora Sun
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 187)

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that infection with the retrovirus LAV/HTLV-III causes a spectrum of outcomes in man ranging from asymptomatic infection to severe immune deficiency complicated by opportunistic infections and neoplasms (1,2). In epidemiologic relationship to the onset of the AIDS epidemic, physicians noted other patients with unexplained fevers, sweats, malaise and in some cases lymphadenopathy (3). These cases were considered related to AIDS in some way, presumably through a cannon environmental exposure, and the term AIDS-related complex (ARC) was coined by an ad hoc group of intra- and extramural NIH investigators.

Keywords

Herpes Zoster Immune Deficiency Syndrome Oral Candidiasis Delay Hypersensitivity Skin Skin Test Antigen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Barre-Sinoussi F, Chermann JC, Rey F, et al. Isolation of a T-lymphotropic virus from a patient at risk for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Science 22H: 868–71 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gallo R, Salahuddin S, Fopovic M, et al. Frequent detection and isolation of cytopathic retroviruses (HTLV-III) from patients with AIDS and at risk for AIDS. Science 22i: 500–03 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Metroka CE, tanningham-Rundles Sf Pollack MS, et al. Generalized lymphadenopathy in homosexual men. Ann Int Med. 2i: 585–91 (1983).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Mathur-Wagh ü, Enlow RW, Spigland I, Longitudinal study of persistent generalized lymphadenopathy in homosexual men: relation to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Lancet i: 1033–8 (1984).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Abrams DIf Lewis BJ, Beckstead JH, Persistent diffuse lymphadenopathy in homosexual men: endpoint or prodrome? Ann Int Med. 100: 801–8 (1984).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Safai B, Sarngadharan MG, Groopnan JE, et al. Seroepidemiologic studies of HTLV-III in AIDS. Lancet 1: 1438–40 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Brun-Vezinet F, Barre-Sinoussi F, Saimot AG, et al. Detection of IgG antibodies to lymphadenopathy-associated virus in patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy syndrome. Lancet 1: 1253–6 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Schroff RS, Gottlieb MS, Prince HE, et al. Immunologic studies of homosexual men with immunodeficiency and Kaposi’s sarcoma. CLin. Immunol, and Immunopathol. 22: 300–14 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Klein RS, Harris CA, Small CB, et al. Oral candidiasis in high risk patients as the initial manifestation of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. N Engl J Med. 311: 354–58 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Gottlieb MS, Wolfe PR, Mitsuyasu RT. Immunotherapy of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. In: Advances in Host Defense Mechanisms, Gallin J and Fauci A, (eds.) New York:Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael S. Gottlieb
    • 1
  • Peter R. Wolfe
    • 1
  • John L. Fahey
    • 1
  • Steven Knight
    • 1
  • David Hardy
    • 1
  • Lawrence Eppolito
    • 1
  • Ellyn Ashida
    • 1
  • Amit Patel
    • 1
  • Gildon N. Beall
    • 1
  • Nora Sun
    • 1
  1. 1.UCLA Center for Health Sciences and Harbor-UCLA Medical CenterLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations