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Polyethylene Glycols as Oligomeric Host Solvents: Applications to Oxidation and Reduction Reactions

  • Enzo Santaniello
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (POLS)

Abstract

Polyethylene glycols (PEG) are oligomeric diols of the general formula HO(-CH2-CH2-O)n-H, which are commercially available also under tne trade name of Carbowax. They can be regarded as protic solvents with aprotic sites of binding constituted by the oxyethylene units (-CH2-CH2-O-). A few inorganic salts as well as many organic substrates are soluble in low molecular weight PEG (\(\overline {\text{M}}\) ranging from 200 to 600), which have been recently proposed as solvents for organic reactions1. PEG were named “host” solvents, since they have the capability of forming complexes with some cations. This fact has been sustained by 1H-N.M.R. studies2 and isolation of a few solid complexes3. Further, PEG have a viscosity which is compatible with usual laboratory operations and offer a few advantages such as ready availability at low price, low vapour pressure and biodegradability.

Keywords

Crown Ether Polyethylene Glycol Sodium Borohydride Potassium Dichromate 4benzyl Bromide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Enzo Santaniello
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Chimica, Facoltà di MedicinaUniversità di MilanoMilanoItaly

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