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Turnover of Molecular Species of Diacyl and Alkyl Ether Phospholipids in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

  • Keizo Waku
  • Yasuo Nakazawa
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 101)

Abstract

The biosynthetic route of alkyl ether phospholipid has been established by Hajra (1,2) and Snyder (3), and the biological role of this phospholipid has been studied by several researchers (4–7). A significant amount of 1-0-alkyl-2-acyl-GPE(C) was found in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (8) and the rapid turnover rate of ethanolamine alkyl ether phospholipid has been demonstrated by an incorporation experiment of phospholipid precursors, 32Pi, [l-14C]-glycerol and [1-14C]acetate injected into the peritoneal cavity of mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (9). In this paper, [1-14C]glycerol was injected into the peritoneal cavity of mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and the incorporation rate of radioactivity into every molecular species of alkyl ether phospholipids was estimated.

Keywords

Molecular Species Incorporation Rate Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cell Alkyl Ether Ether Phospholipid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keizo Waku
    • 1
  • Yasuo Nakazawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Research InstituteTokyo Medical and Dental Univ.TokyoJapan

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