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Programming Languages

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter is intended as an introduction to programming languages. More detailed discussions will be given elsewhere in this series, and we shall limit ourselves here to a general discussion of the present status of the development of programming languages and of their theoretical foundations.

Keywords

Machine Tool Programming Language Program Language Operational Meaning Simulation Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centro Studi Calcolatrici Elettroniche del C.N.R.presso l’Università di PisaPisaItaly

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